The family of JSG Hoffmann

Carl Friedrich Samuel NuskeAge: 74 years18571931

Name
Carl Friedrich Samuel Nuske
Given names
Carl Friedrich Samuel
Surname
Nuske
Birth March 15, 1857 39 30
Birth of a son
#1
Edward Nuske

Birth of a sisterAnna Henrietta Nuske
October 1, 1858 (Age 18 months)
Birth of a brotherGustav Adolph Nuske
July 16, 1860 (Age 3 years)
Death of a brotherGustav Adolph Nuske
March 5, 1861 (Age 3 years)
Note: Altmann Family Tree has death date as: 5 February 1861
Death of a sisterJuliane Auguste Nuske
March 29, 1861 (Age 4 years) Age: Listed as 7
Birth of a sisterErnestine Dorothea Nuske
August 22, 1862 (Age 5 years)
Death of a sisterAnna Henrietta Nuske
March 18, 1864 (Age 7 years)
Birth of a sisterMathilda Johanna Nuske
April 28, 1864 (Age 7 years)
Birth of a brotherErnst Gotthard Nuske
about 1865 (Age 7 years)

Death of a maternal grandfatherJohann Samuel Gottlieb Hoffmann
April 27, 1865 (Age 8 years)
Birth of a brotherCarl Rudolph (Robert) Nuske
June 5, 1866 (Age 9 years)
Note: Headstone has birthdate 5th of July. Also some resources say born in Lobethal.
Birth of a sisterEmma Emilie Nuske
October 10, 1868 (Age 11 years)
Birth of a brotherPaul Emanuel Nuske
December 4, 1870 (Age 13 years)
Death of a brotherPaul Emanuel Nuske
1874 (Age 16 years)

Birth of a son
#2
Friedrich Carl (Frederick) Nuske
December 1, 1884 (Age 27 years)
Birth of a son
#3
Wilhelm Gustav (William) Nuske
April 15, 1886 (Age 29 years)
Birth of a daughter
#4
Annie Nuske
1887 (Age 29 years)

Birth of a child
#5
Carl Edward (Charlie) Nuske
September 25, 1888 (Age 31 years)
Birth of a daughter
#6
Rosalie Florentine (Rose) Nuske
1897 (Age 39 years)
Birth of a daughter
#7
Leontine Flora (Florrie) Nuske
1898 (Age 40 years)

Death of a fatherJohann Gottlieb Nuske
July 23, 1899 (Age 42 years)
Birth of a son
#8
Julius Victor (Victor) Nuske
1900 (Age 42 years)

Death of a motherJohanna Henriette Christiane (Hetta) Hoffmann
September 2, 1907 (Age 50 years)
Occupation
Farmer
between 1884 and 1911 (Age 26 years)
Address: own Farm - 319 acres
Occupation
Labourer

Residence between 1884 and 1911 (Age 26 years)
Residence 1911 (Age 53 years)
Residence 1919 (Age 61 years)
Death of a sisterMathilda Johanna Nuske
February 26, 1926 (Age 68 years)

Death of a sisterPauline Anna Nuske
1928 (Age 70 years)

Death May 31, 1931 (Age 74 years)
Burial June 2, 1931 (2 days after death)
Address: Horsham Cemetery
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: May 1, 1849Lobethal, , South Australia, Australia
5 months
elder brother
14 months
elder sister
2 years
elder brother
17 months
elder brother
15 months
elder sister
Juliane Auguste Nuske
Birth: August 1, 1855 37 28Mount Torrens, SA
Death: March 29, 1861Lobethal, , South Australia, Australia
19 months
himself
19 months
younger sister
Anna Henrietta Nuske
Birth: October 1, 1858 40 31Lobethal, , South Australia, Australia
Death: March 18, 1864Neudorf, , South Australia, Australia
21 months
younger brother
Gustav Adolph Nuske
Birth: July 16, 1860 42 33Lobethal, , South Australia, Australia
Death: March 5, 1861Lobethal, , South Australia, Australia
2 years
younger sister
20 months
younger sister
20 months
younger brother
17 months
younger brother
2 years
younger sister
2 years
younger brother
Family with Augusta Amelia Frederike (Emily) Nuske - View this family
himself
wife
son
Friedrich Carl (Frederick) Nuske
Birth: December 1, 1884 27 19Katyil, , Victoria, Australia
Death: February 2, 1981Melbourne, , Victoria, Australia
16 months
son
Wilhelm Gustav (William) Nuske
Birth: April 15, 1886 29 21Katyil, , Victoria, Australia
Death: July 10, 1970Springvale, , Victoria, Australia
21 months
daughter
21 months
child
Carl Edward (Charlie) Nuske
Birth: September 25, 1888 31 23Katyil, , Victoria, Australia
Death: May 4, 1971Little River, , Victoria, Australia
son
daughter
Rosalie Florentine (Rose) Nuske
Birth: 1897 39 31Dimboola, , Victoria, Australia
Death: 1974Ballarat, , Victoria, Australia
2 years
daughter
3 years
son
son
Private

Note

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Tue 7 Aug 1923 p5 Maintenance Claim WIFE OBTAINS ORDER AGAINST HUSBAND. The case of Nuske v. Nuske, a wife's claim against her husband for maintenance, was called at the Horsham Police Court on Friday morning, be fore Mr. W. C. Wilson, P.M. Mr. Wilmoth appeared for Mrs. Nuske, the plaintiff, and Mr. J. Bennett for Mr. Nuske,. the defendant. Mr. Wilmoth said the -parties had -been married for many years. As far back at 1884 defendant was a farmer. They resided in the Dimboola district. Defendant finally sold his farm, and -since then he had done practically nothing for the support of his wife. For many years she grew garden stuff, and kept fowls to maintain herself. Defendant went in and out, but did not give his wife much money. Some years ago one of the sons got a place near Haven, and defendant and his wife went to live there. Defendant, while working, did not give his wife much money. Eighteen months ago defendant left home and went away working. His wife asked- him not to go. He came back two or three times, and finally left on February 22. He had not been back since. From that time his wife had received nothing. There was no reason why he should leave home. When proceedings were threatened he arranged to pay £1 a week to his wife. This £1 a week was paid for a while. The last payment was on February 9 this year, when the payments ceased and complained had received nothing from. her husband. It was not a case of a wife refusing to live with her husband. When he sold his farm and left Dimboola he had some hundreds of pounds, When they came to Horsham the wife had several cows and some fowls, As nothing was coming in she had to gradually dispose of them. At present she had one cow, and was entirely dependent on what the children gave her. Emily Frederica Augusta Nuske, now living at Haven, said she had been married to Charles Frederick Samuel Nuske in 1884;. At that time they were living at Katyil, near Dimboola. He had a farm of 319 acres 12 or 14 years ago. Four years ago they came to Horsham. Witness supported her counsel's statement as to the payment of £1 a week for a while. He had been a well-to-do farmer, and a decent man, but he went to places where he should not go. She had about £10, and got a rental of 5/ a week for two acres. Mr. Bennett : Do you think your husband deliberately sold the farm and left you to starve? He kept me that silly that I had not time even to read. Complainant said there had been nine in the family. There were five now the youngest 18, and the eldest 40. Mr. Bennett : Did he not support them.-Not much; I had to work on the farm. Mr. Bennett : Don't other farmers' wives work' on the farm? -He made a slave of me. Complainant said there were three sons living at home, Two paid £1 a week for board, The young-. est gave her his money. She did not charge him anything. He earned £3 a week. She did not think it would be fair to charge the youngest, she j put the money in the bank for him. There was £50-to his credit in her name now. Did you not sell the cows because the land at Haven would not keep them? What would your husband, find to do there -There is plenty to do ; make a garden. Does not your husband go away to earn money? - It is no good his earning money. He goes through with it. During the last year, since September, he gave me £33. How do you think your husband can get money by following his occupation as a farm labourer without going away? -I don't want him to do so. Would you be satisfied if your husband went home to do nothing - You cannot expect me to keep him. I don't think he would be any more good now. Will you take him back again? - I don't know. If your husband says he is quite willing to live at home would you be willing to take him - I don't think so. He ill-treats me, he hits me and kicks me, and he swears-something frightful. He is good to strangers, but not to me or his own children. Do you know that the mortgagee took his farm and sold it? - He put money in the bank. Is there any farm work he could get so that he could get home at night - He would not do it, When you get him home don't you "nag" at him - He has not spoken to me for nine or ten years. Complainant, in answer to further questions, said she had told her husband there were places he should not go to. She had followed him on one occasion to a house where he had put bags on his horse (to prevent identification). It was not a bit of imagination. She made certain accusations against her husband which were true. Did you accuse him of, going to the blacks' camp. Do you believe that is true? - Yes. Do you remember when he was working at Martin's you went up to see if he was in bed? - he was not in bed. I had some good reason. Did you put kerosene tins against your husband's door so that he could not get away? - He never put a lock on his door. Mr. Bennett said the woman was suffering from hallucination.- Her husband was a decent, hard-working man. About 25 years ago he had met with reverses, and at present was earning nothing. The wife would not permit him to go away to earn money. Charles Frederick Samuel Nuske, husband of the last Witness, said he had, farm at Antwerp. The mortgagee foreclosed, and he got nothing. He gave his wife two acres for peace sake. He was prepared to live at home. He worked as a farm labourer and had about £8 or £9 saved up now. He was 66 years of age, and suffered from rheumatism. He had earned 25/ a week during the seeding time for five weeks. He was at present at Wollermann's working for his board. To the Police Magistrate : He would expect to earn £1 or 25/ a week when at work. Defendant said he could not make a living on the ten acres at Haven. The place would not keep a fellow a fellow had to keep it. He was pre pared to live at home on certain conditions. What are the conditions? - I don't think she is quite right. Defendant said she would have got some money if she had not summoned him. The P.M.: How much could you pay towards your wife's maintenance? - It depends on when I get work. To Mr. Wilmoth: At haymaking he would have to be satisfied with half the regular wage of £3 10/. The P.M.: I will make an order for 7/6 a week, with one surety of £10, and £2 7/6 costs.